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 Forum index » Discussion » Composition
Can rhythm be too rhythmic?
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A E J O T Z



Joined: Aug 14, 2011
Posts: 423
Location: Griffith, Indiana, USA
Audio files: 148

PostPosted: Sun Feb 21, 2016 6:02 pm    Post subject: Can rhythm be too rhythmic? Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I used to be annoyed by too-perfect rhythms and insisted on playing all my synth parts by hand. But I find myself increasingly using sequencing and quantizing. This is probably because I'm such a crummy keyboard player.

Too-perfect rhythm in music is the topic of the following scientific article:

http://www.nld.ds.mpg.de/~holgerh/articles/Hennig_2012_phystoday.pdf

On the last page is a link to another page with audio examples of different kinds of rhythmic "fixing" featuring music by J. S. Bach and Michael Jackson.

I'm serious.

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Grumble



Joined: Nov 23, 2015
Posts: 834
Location: Netherlands
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 23, 2016 5:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Thank you for sharing this! Very informative piece.
People have a natural tendency to sync with other people, but also with sound and/or visual stimuli.
I play African percussion for over a decade now, and as we play with our group in public the movement of the public tells us how we are doing. If we play faster, the public moves faster, when we lower the bpm of our rhythm the public moves slower, but for this to happen we have to be in sync with each other.
My daytime job is working as an engineer at a university, and in our group there is a lot of research going on about Parkinson disease.
Some patients have troubles to start moving and when they hear a clicking sound or see a flashing rhythm, they move more easily.
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Grumble



Joined: Nov 23, 2015
Posts: 834
Location: Netherlands
Audio files: 27

PostPosted: Tue Feb 23, 2016 9:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I just realize why people are so susceptible to rhythm: Your ears are vary sensitive to phase difference, because that's the way we perceive the direction of the sound source.
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